Take a Look at the GLOA 400 Capstone courses offered for Spring 2019!

 

 

Students have the exciting opportunity to explore globalization in a range of specific contexts in GLOA 400: Global Affairs Capstone. Drawing on faculty members’ research expertise and experience in the field, GLOA 400 is designed to bring the skills students gained in their interdisciplinary core and concentration courses into the exploration of a pressing global issue.

 

GLOA 400-001: Globalization in Asia

Dr. Byunghwan Son

Is China a ‘winner’ of economic globalization? What is 'Orphanage Tour' in Cambodia? Is globalization taking place even in North Korea? Why are immigration laws so strict in Japan and South Korea? If you find these questions interesting, Globalization in Asia is the class you are looking for. In this course, we talk about the challenges each Asian society in the region faces in political, economic, and/or cultural globalization. The specific issue areas where this discussion takes place includes, but not limited to, democratic regime; welfare system; immigration; financial crisis; territorial disputes; corruption; inequality; transitional justice and human rights. While China, South Korea, and Japan will be the primary countries of interest, a substantial amount of time will be also spent on discussions on other Asian countries, particularly those in Southeast and South Asia. The course is open to all Mason students but should be of particular interest for GLOA majors with one of the four concentrations: Global Economy and Management; Global Governance; International Development; Asia. The course counts toward Asia-Pacific & Northeast Asian Studies Minor’s ‘elective courses’ requirement. The course also fulfills the Mason Core ‘Synthesis’ requirement. Please note if you are counting this course as a concentration course, it cannot double count anywhere else.

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GLOA 400-002: Global Crises: Cities and Urbanization

Dr. Johanna Bockman

How are cities around the world in crisis? A crisis for whom? In this course, we will explore the challenges facing global cities, megacities, (post-)socialist cities, and cities right at our doorstep. Some of these challenges involve world-wide gentrification, segregation, and displacement; modern architecture and urban informality; deepening inequality; and urban revolution. The course is open to all Mason students but should be of particular interest for GLOA majors with one of the four concentrations: Global Economy and Management; Global Inequalities and Responses; Human Security; and Media, Communication, and Culture. The course also fulfills the Mason Core ‘Synthesis’ requirement. Please note if you are counting this course as a concentration course, it cannot double count anywhere else

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GLOA 400-003: Global Social Movements

Professor Craig Willse

This course will introduce students to theories and histories of grassroots social movements in the United States and around the globe. What causes people to organize against social, economic, and racial inequality? How do movements identify and pursue their goals? What roles do protest, strikes, art and media, and civil disobedience play? Why do some movements succeed and others fail? We will pursue these and other questions by looking at both historical and contemporary examples of social movements that target a wide range of issues, including LGBT and women’s rights, police and prisons, political repression, working conditions, the environment, and more.

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